GOLDEN YEARS

 

The care of older pets is directed at preventing premature aging, minimizing physical and emotional stresses, managing chronic medical conditions and meeting the special needs of the seniors [2,4,6].


Ensuring that the process of aging will not reduce the quality of life for them and they remain carefree and happy [1,2].

 

The art of caring and managing Senior Health should be carefully crafted and best achieved by working closely with a experienced medical team like us.

 

Above: Age chart to help owners appreciate the life stages their pet is in, understand the physiological age and how to provide the needed care [3]. Table adapted from Treatment and Care of the Geriatric Veterinary Patient. (10lb = 4.54kg)

 
 

For further discussion about pet care for different species and life stages, please click below:

 

 

YOU DON'T 

STOP HAVING FUN 

WHEN YOU GET OLD.

 

YOU GET OLD

WHEN YOU 

STOP HAVING FUN.

 

BESPOKE

Senior dog with arthritis hospitalized because of an open pressure sore, still enjoying a bit of a walk (bottom) and a good laugh (left) with assistance from the helium balloons.

Senior dog under the watchful eye of the vet (ICU) after surgery.

Senior dog hospitalized for observation, throwing a tantrum because she was bored and not impressed by the staff.

Senior guide dog admitted for observation.

Senior dog that only allows one specific person in the clinic to trim his nails and clean his ears.

Senior Chinchilla admitted for fur trimming.

Senior dog taking an afternoon nap at the reception lobby while being hospitalized.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

While every pet should have an annual physical examination, a pet older than 7 years who is in relatively good health should have a complete veterinary examination at least once a year, preferably twice a year [2].

THE BODY SYSTEMS TO MONITOR FOR GERIATRICS [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]:

 

EYES


Sclerosis of the lens Senile cataract Glaucoma (Increased IOP) Dry eyes (KCS)




EARS


Loss of hearing. Ear infection due to excessive ear discharge.




ORAL CAVITY


Decay teeth Gingivitis Calculus build-up Oral pain Inability to eat Loss of taste




NOSE


Loss of sense of smell Loss of sense of taste Loss interest in food




SKIN


Loss of elasticity Dryness and flakiness Slow healing and repair Itchiness Easily injured Fur loss




JOINTS & LIMBS


Arthritis Muscle atrophy Loss of elasticity in soft tissue structure Loss of mobility Slow healing and repair Stiffness




DIET


Unable to digest certain type of food Unable to absorb certain type of nutrients Unable to chew hard food Unable to taste




CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM


The cognitive function/ dysfunction/ sleep disorder - DISHA / DISH (refer to explanation below).





Table adapted from Treatment and Care of the Geriatric Veterinary Patient.

The DISHA guideline for the clients to determine if cognitive dysfunction is present. DISHA stands for disorientation, interactions, sleep‐wake cycle disturbances, house‐soiling, and activity level alterations [3].

ANNUAL GERIATRIC MEDICAL PROTOCOL [2]

 

This should include:

 

  • Complete blood count

  • Blood chemistries 

  • Blood pressure reading 

  • Tear production measurement

  • Corneal surface assessment

  • Intraocular pressure (IOP)  measurement

  • Retina scan

  • Ear drum scope

  • Oral cavity examination

  • Mobility and weight bearing analysis

  • Skin and fur coat examination

  • Parasite examination 

  • Urinalysis

  • Chest x-ray and electrocardiogram as needed

  • Routine dental care and maintenance

Attribution:

1. Coffey, L.T. (2015). My Old Dog. Rescued Pets with Remarkable Second Acts. California: New World Library

2. Davies, M. (1996). Canine and Feline Geriatrics. UK: Wiley-Blackwell

3. Gardner, M., McVety, D. (2017). Treatment and Care of the Geriatric Veterinary Patient. UK: Wiley-Blackwell

4. Gram, W.D.; Milner, R.J.; Lobetti, R. (2018). Chronic Disease Management for Small Animal. USA: Wiley-Blackwell

5. Landsberg, G.; Madari, A.; Zilka, N. (2017). Canine and Feline Dementia. Molecular Basis, Diagnostics and Therapy. Switzerland: Springer

6. Shanan, A.; Pierce, J.; Shearer, T. (2017). Hospice and Palliative Care for Companion Animals. Principles and Practice. UK: Wiley-Blackwell

 

7. Shojai, A.D. (2010). Complete Care for Your Aging Cat, 2nd Ed. US: Wiley

 

LOCATION

Blk 703 Bedok Reservoir Road 

#01-3508 Singapore 470703

 

CONTACT

Tel: 62433282 

(By Appointment Only)

Email: lightoflifevet@live.com.sg

 

OPERATING HOURS

Afternoon 12pm to 5pm

Evening 8pm to 11pm 

Closed on Tuesdays, Sundays and All Public Holidays

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Information and opinions stated should not be used for diagnosis or treatment, and are not intended to replace advice and/or treatment provided by your qualified veterinarian. We disclaim responsibility for the consequences of any action you may or may not take based on this information. Please make an appointment to consult your veterinarian for specific advice and treatment. Full Disclaimer.

No Nonsense Creation Care

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Light of Life Veterinary Clinic & Services